Winning Behavior

This book is about behavioral differentiation—how companies differentiate themselves from their competitors based on how they behave toward customers.  Behavioral differentiation is more than superior customer service, which typically occurs at or after the point of sale.  Smart companies differentiate themselves at every touchpoint with their customers—and the engines that drive behavioral differentiation are leadership, culture, and process.  It requires leadership at the top, a culture in which superior behavior toward customers is pervasive and endemic, and processes that make behavioral differentiation routine and measurable.

This book was developed from research we conducted at Lore International Institute on how the best-in-class companies in various industries differentiate themselves, particularly when some of their competitors offer essentially the same products or services and equal them in the quality of their customer service.

Our central theme is that numerous market forces have made it increasingly difficult for companies to create and sustain the traditional sources of differentiation in their products and services.  This is true in part because globalization has heightened competition in virtually every industry and market.  It’s also true because the relentless drive among companies to improve product quality and operating efficiency has tended to level the playing field.

Companies like Disney, Nordstrom, Southwest Airlines, Ritz-Carlton, Men’s Wearhouse, and Harley-Davidson outperform their competitors by outbehaving them.   Winning Behavior explores how they do that.

Author(s): Terry R. Bacon and David G. Pugh
# of pages: 352
Publication date: July 2003
Publisher: AMACOM Books
Available at: http://store.lominger.com/store/lominger/en_US/pd/productID.172055300
www.amazon.com
www.barnesandnoble.com
Relevant Research: This book was developed from research we conducted at Lore International Institute (now part of Korn/Ferry’s Leadership and Talent Consulting group) on how the best-in-class companies in various industries differentiate themselves, particularly when some of their competitors offer essentially the same products or services and equal them in the quality of their customer service. Our central theme is that numerous market forces have made it increasingly difficult for companies to create and sustain the traditional sources of differentiation in their products and services.  This is true in part because globalization has heightened competition in virtually every industry and market.  It’s also true because the relentless drive among companies to improve product quality and operating efficiency has tended to level the playing field. Companies like Disney, Nordstrom, Southwest Airlines, Ritz-Carlton, Men’s Wearhouse, and Harley-Davidson outperform their competitors by outbehaving them.   Winning Behavior explores how they do that.
 
 
Reviews & Comments: …nothing average about this book. If you are trying to excel […] put this one on your CEO’s desk tomorrow morning.” – TrainingAn engaging, thoughtful, and intelligent look at what makes the difference between winners and mere survivors in today’s tough markets.  –Jim Osborn, Vice President of Business Development, INTEC EngineeringAs stimulating and insightful as anything I’ve read and winning and keeping customers, and I’ve been at it for over 25 years.  –Pat Klein, Vice President, PCLBacon and Pugh have not only it the bull’s eye on being different and better, they’ve created a new target for smart companies to hit.  –Jonas Hogberg, General Manager, Sales & System Solutions, Ericsson JapanThe authors’ numerous examples of behavioral differentiation provide a clear blueprint for improving your  business at every touchpoint.  –Mike Robertson, Manager, Business Development, AMEC E&C Services LimitedOutbehaving the competition—thereby raising your client’s expectations and your own performance—is a significant leading edge concept.  Bacon and Pugh deliver it with punch.  –David L. Myers, President, Executive Impact

One Response to “Winning Behavior”

  1. It’s amazing how quickly larger companies can devalue the importance of a good customer connection. Authentic rapport and helpfulness will always be remembered much more than a flashy gadget.

Leave a Reply